Eucharistic Ministers & Ministers of the Word

Ministers of the Eucharist October. Unable to attend, please exchange with another Minister
07.00pm Mary Butler Joe Murphy Teresa Cassin
11.00am Tom Brett Carmel Coone Majella Morrissey

Ministers of the Word for October. Unable to attend, please exchange with another Minister
07.00pm
Michael Piert
Aleena

About Eucharistic Ministers & Ministers of the Word

Chapel Hill

Saturday (week 1, 3 and 5): 5.45pm

About Chapel Hill

Mong Chapel

Saturday (week 2 and 4): 5.45pm

About Mong Chapel

Church of the Assumption

Vigil Saturday at 7pm
Sunday – 11.00am
Weekdays – Mon, Wed, Fri – 9.30am

Confessions after 7pm Mass when requested.

About Church of the Assumption

Fr Dan’s sermon about life being wonderfully complicated

 

The Parish Newsletter from Sunday 30th September discussed a piece from Amoris Laetitia: “The Church must propose the full ideal of marriage. She is also conscious of the frailty of many of her children. She must accompany the weakest of her children, who show signs of a wounded and troubled love, by restoring in them hope and confidence. Let us not forget that the Church’s task is often like that of a field hospital. She does not disregard the constructive elements in those situations which do not yet or no longer correspond to her teaching on marriage. There is a need to avoid judgments which do not take into account the complexity of various situations. It can no longer simply be said that all those in any ‘irregular’ situation are living in a state of mortal sin and are deprived of sanctifying grace. General rules can’t provide absolutely for all particular situations. The Gospel tells us not to judge or condemn. Jesus expects us to enter into the reality of other people’s lives and to know the power of tenderness. Whenever we do so, our lives become wonderfully complicated. (Sections 291 to 312.Titled ‘Accompanying, discerning and integrating weakness’, this chapter ought to be read fully)

At Mass on Sunday 7th October 2018 Fr Dan spoke about the thought in Amoris Laetitia of life being ‘wonderfully complicated’.

Pope Francis, in his letter following the Synod on the Family, Amoris Laetitiae – The Joy of Love – writes beautifully and realistically about married love and the joys and challenges of married love. This is why he came to Ireland in August, to put before us his Gospel love and specially married and family love.

Chapter 8 of Amoris Laetitiae is titled “Accompanying, discerning and integrating weakness”. In this chapter Pope Francis emphasises that the Church always upholds the ideal, but rather than being a society of perfect people, the Church is akin to a field hospital. Think of field hospitals we have seen on television news programmes as people try to respond to the recent earthquakes and tsunamis in Indonesia. The picture of field hospitals they presented was far from the ideal,  – sometimes no electricity, working in tents, or indeed in the open, little medication and bad conditions for surgery, and yet, in very difficult circumstances the rescuers were doing heroic work. Pope Francis has the same thing in mind for marriages and family circumstance in which people live today. Sometimes situations are far from ideal, far from what we might like them to be, and yet, notwithstanding all that, there are often signs of great heroism, great love, great life, real growth.

Pope Francis asks us not to judge – general rules can’t provide for every situation.

‘Jesus expects us to enter into the reality of other people’s lives and to know the power of tenderness. Whenever we do so, our lives become wonderfully complicated’ (Section 308).  Isn’t that a great way to describe things. We would love that things be all tidy and neatly wrapped up. That is far from the reality for many people. Still, we are called to bring into the lives of others the ‘power of tenderness’. And we are reminded that our lives will become ‘wonderfully complicated’.

That expression comes from Evangelii Gaudium, the Pope’s first Apostolic Exhortation on the Proclamation of the Gospel in Today’s World, written in 2013. In his exhortation he writes ‘Sometimes we are tempted to be that kind of Christian who keeps the Lord’s wounds at arm’s length. Yet Jesus wants us to touch human misery, to touch the suffering flesh of others. He hopes that we will stop looking for those personal or communal niches which shelter us from the maelstrom of human misfortune and instead enter into the reality of other people’ lives and know the power of tenderness. Whenever we do so, our lives become wonderfully complicated and we experience intensely what it is to be a people, to be part of a people/’ (Section 270)